plants for water gardens 11

plants for water gardens 11
impression plants for water gardens 11
graphic plants for water gardens 11

Hanging Water Gardens™, Plant Rooters, Plant Starters, basically it’s the same thing — the most elegant, stylish and care-free way to grow a wide variety of plants in water. Grow plants such as ivy, philodendron, spider plants, impatiens, begonias, basil, mint, rosemary… the list goes on and on. Our Vermont Nature Creations hand crafted Hanging Water Gardens™ are an easy way to grow and enjoy plants indoors. No green thumb? No problem. It’s all because of hydroponics. Plants have been growing like this forever. It’s simple — water, air and light. Forget messing with  soil.For years, we at Vermont Nature Creations have been designing and handcrafting beautiful ways to start and grow plants in water. You may have seen us at some of the big art shows or flower shows like the Philadelphia Flower Show, Boston Flower Show, Chicago, Cincinnati, just to name a few. Our creations have been voted best of show over a dozen times, (not like we are bragging or anything).We are a family business. All of our designs are hand made in America. We use only the finest metals and beautiful stained glass. Each piece is individually crafted and every step is done by hand from start to finish.The best part is how beautiful our Hanging Water Gardens™ will look in your window, bursting with color and life. Whether it’s for yourself or a plant lover you know, our Hanging Water Gardens™ add a gorgeous splash of art and elegance to any room. Hang one right in the kitchen window for a beautiful place to grow and root herbs. It’s lively and bright, plus totally convenient while you’re cooking — no need to trudge out to the garden every time you need a fresh snip of basil or mint.So if you’re looking for Hanging Water Gardens™, plant rooters, plant starters, brass butterfly’s, brass dragonfly’s,  stained glass hummingbirds or just the most decorative way to grow plants in water, you’ve found it. That’s us – Vermont Nature Creations. We pour our effort and creativity into giving you the quality and style you’ll love. We hope that our creations will bring you years of happiness.-David and Janet


Hanging Water Gardens™, Plant Rooters, Plant Starters, basically it’s the same thing — the most elegant, stylish and care-free way to grow a wide variety of plants in water. Grow plants such as ivy, philodendron, spider plants, impatiens, begonias, basil, mint, rosemary… the list goes on and on. Our Vermont Nature Creations hand crafted Hanging Water Gardens™ are an easy way to grow and enjoy plants indoors. No green thumb? No problem. It’s all because of hydroponics. Plants have been growing like this forever. It’s simple — water, air and light. Forget messing with  soil.


Floating plants Floating plants like Water Hyacinths and Water Lettuce simply sit on your pond's surface. Roots drift below and act as filters. These easy-care plants provide surface cover, shade, and hiding places for fish. Many floating plants also produce flowers that can cleverly - and beautifully - disguise filtration or other elements. Floating plants use nutrients from the water, competing with algae and improving water clarity. Rapid growth and the ability to remove excess nutrients from water make floating plants extremely important in keeping a healthy water garden.


quick tips for planting Use Planting Baskets for planting submerged and emergent plants like lilies. Locate near the surface when you first plant, or when plants sprout in the spring; move deeper as plants grow. Pack planting media around roots in basket planters or shallow rim areas of your pond, then top with pebbles. This gives your baskets and planted areas a natural, finished appearance, while preventing plant damage from koi and water currents. Add a variety of hardy plants for your region. They come back year after year and offer a wonderful return on your investment. Divide irises' thick, tough root systems every year or so. Without regular root separation, they flood planters with excess root growth. Dividing plants prevents root compaction and is beneficial to the overall health of the plant. Best of all, you will end up with more plants to re-pot or share with fellow water gardeners. If your pond has no still areas, place floating plants in shallow beds with a rim or in a secured floating barrier. You can also anchor plants to a rim rock with fishing line. Otherwise, they will float into your skimmer.


Underwater plants are essential to the health of a garden pond and to any resident fish. Even though they are not as conspicuous as marginals and floating plants, they play an important role in keeping a pond beautiful. Not only do they provide oxygen to fish, something to snack on and an area for young fish fry to hide, oxygenators help absorb nitrates from the water. Underwater plants use excess nutrients from fish waste, uneaten fish food, etc., for nutrients, which helps cut down on algae. While these plants are appreciated for their beauty in aquariums, underwater pond plants take a backseat to the more showy floating plants.


Submerged plants Submerged plants, such as Anacharis and Cabomba, grow completely underwater. They provide a great place for your fish to hide from predators. These plants are often referred to as "oxygenating" plants as they are very efficient at pulling carbon dioxide from the water and then releasing beneficial oxygen after photosynthesis. These oxygenating plants do not require fertilizing; they use the excess nutrients already present in your pond water.


Marginal or bog plants These colorful, lush plants, which include Cattails and Irises, grow in the shallow water or saturated soil around the rim or margins of a pond. Bog plants tend to be heavy root feeders that search for nutrients primarily from soil or potting media. While they rely minimally on pond water for nutrients, bog plants improve water quality by extracting excess detrimental nutrients from the pond environment before they can accumulate.


Floating plants add interest to the pond surface, as well as remove nutrients from the water with their dangling roots (this is why they usually do not need supplemental fertilization). Several plants mentioned in this section (and many other popular pond plants) are invasive and quickly cover a pond’s surface. Manually remove these plants so that they do not block the surface and take over your pond. And just as with any plant or animal, never allow floating plants to be released into wild habitats.


Growing houseplants in water is also known as hydroponic farming, although when commercially grown in this manner, farmers have a more specific cocktail of water to liquid nutrition instead of soil. We have created our diluted fertilizer and ascertained that our plant will grow in combination with this and water. Now that we have the basics for how to grow plants in water, it is time to choose good plants for water growth.


Some underwater plants, such as Cabomba and Anacharis, will send flowers to the water surface. You will also enjoy the beauty of your underwater plants when you watch your fish swimming in and out from under them. Keep these key pond plants healthy by allowing some open water surface area so that they get enough light for photosynthesis.


Many plants grow easily in water and are an often used method of propagation as well, with some folks choosing to root houseplants in bottles or the like. An indoor water garden may often consist of clippings from existing houseplants in bottles covering every surface available, to a couple of growing plants in water perched on the kitchen windowsill.


Deep water emergent plants Some of the most well-known and recognizable pond plants come from this group, which includes Water Lilies and Lotus. Deep water emergent plant roots grow deep underwater in planters on the pond bottom. Leaves and flowers emerge and spread upon the surface, providing fish and other inhabitants with shade and cover from predators.


The best part is how beautiful our Hanging Water Gardens™ will look in your window, bursting with color and life. Whether it’s for yourself or a plant lover you know, our Hanging Water Gardens™ add a gorgeous splash of art and elegance to any room. Hang one right in the kitchen window for a beautiful place to grow and root herbs. It’s lively and bright, plus totally convenient while you’re cooking — no need to trudge out to the garden every time you need a fresh snip of basil or mint.


So if you’re looking for Hanging Water Gardens™, plant rooters, plant starters, brass butterfly’s, brass dragonfly’s,  stained glass hummingbirds or just the most decorative way to grow plants in water, you’ve found it. That’s us – Vermont Nature Creations. We pour our effort and creativity into giving you the quality and style you’ll love. We hope that our creations will bring you years of happiness.


Water hyacinth plants, which float due to their air-filled stems, have waxy green leaves and send up 6-inch-tall flower spikes with light purple blooms (with a spot of yellow near the center) in the summer. The blooms only last for one day, but flower spikes can have up to 15 flowers. Fish will use the long, dangling roots of water hyacinth as a spawning area, and roots also provide shelter and tiny foods for fry. Water hyacinth is efficient at removing excess nutrients from water. This plant grows quickly by sending out runners and is invasive in the southern United States, so you will need to thin it out often.

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